We are all ChiroQueens!

This is our safe, innovative, creative, compassionate community of like-minded providers, patients, mothers, daughters, sisters, friends and loved ones.

Pelvic Floor Anatomy

The pelvic floor consists of striated muscles, ligaments, and connective tissues that support the pelvic organs against gravity and intraabdominal pressure. The musculoskeletal structure has been vastly overlooked in the past in terms of diagnosis and treatment and as a primary and secondary source of pelvic floor dysfunction. In the past, it was thought that the pelvic diaphragm is composed of the coccygeus muscle posteriorly and the levator ani anterolaterally. Emerging evidence and focus on anatomy has identified a much more complex interrelationship between several individual muscles; each with their own distinct function, action and susceptibility to injury.

The components of the levator ani consist of the iliococcygeus, the pubococcygeus, pubovaginalis and the puborectalis. Superficial muslces include bulbocavernosus, ischiocavernosus and transverse perioneal.

Function

The pelvic floor must allow relaxation of this support at the urogenital hiatus during voiding and parturition while maintaining the anatomic position of pelvic structures. The complex mechanics of its bimodal function and frequent insults to the integrity of the pelvic diaphragm from gravity, daily activities, and vaginal birth contribute to the pelvic musculature’s vulnerability to damage and injury. Lying within the pelvic cavity are the piriformis, and obturator muscles, which are not elements of the pelvic diaphragm but may contribute to pelvic pain when injured.

These muscles are easily accessible from an intravaginal perspective. Many underlying hip, low back and sacroiliac pain syndromes begin with PF dysfunction. This is why it is critical to consider more than just the levator and coccygeus muscle groups.

Risk Factors for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Risk factors for women to develop pelvic floor dysfunction include a history of pregnancy, participation in athletics, obesity, sexual trauma, altered biomechanices of the back, pelvis or lower extremity, menopause, surgery, and carrying children on their hips.

Common Signs and Symptoms

Common signs and symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction include but are not limited to low back pain, pelvic pain, urinary or fecal incontinence, organ prolapse, pain with intercourse and a pressure sensation in the pelvis.

Too often these signs and symptoms are simply accepted as “normal” process of aging in women. These signs and symptoms can show up at almost any age from teen years through the golden years of life.

ChiroQueen Concierge can set you free from suffering!

ChiroQueen Concierge Providers

are trained to diagnose and treat pelvic floor dysfunction resulting in a wide array of pelvic floor conditions including: incontinence, prolapse, low back pain, pelvic pain, pain with intercourse and, coccyx pain.

Whether you are seeking to get out of pain, increase

your exercise intensity, have a much more enjoyable pregnancy, prepare yourself for your recovery, recover and regain your body after pregnancy or arm yourself to fight the “silent epidemic” of pelvic floor dysfunction, a ChiroQueen Concierge Provider can help set you free from suffering

ChiroQueen Concierge providers have successfully graduated from the ChiroQueen Academy and are able to diagnose and treat pelvic floor dysfunction and conditions.

COZEAN PELVIC DYSFUNCTION SCREENING PROTOCOL

IF YOU CHECKED 3 OR MORE CIRCLES, PELVIC FLOOR DYSFUNCTION IS LIKELY

Pelvic Dysfunction Screening Protocol form by Nicole Cozean, PT, DPT, WCS, CSCS and Jesse Cozean, MBA ​
DISCLAIMER: If you experience one or more of these symptoms please seek medical attention. This is not a substitute for proper medical care. This information is not intended to diagnose or treat these medical conditions. Seek care from a licensed provider.

Free Yourself, Discover Your Voice & Blow the whistle on the Silent Epidemic of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Discover Pelvic Power Release

A revolutionary manual pelvic floor diagnostic & treatment technique

Learn more about ChiroQueen Concierge Services

ACADEMY NEWSLETTERS

VOL. 1 | ISSUE 1

NEW THIS ISSUE

Rockstar Manual Pelvic Floor Exams

“Turn that Hand Upside Down”

Key Questions:

  1. Which two muscles are the most important to palpate for spasticity?
  2. Which three muscled make up the levator ani complex?

Click on the photo of the newsletter to download a copy!

VOL. 1 | ISSUE 2

NEW THIS ISSUE

When Kegels Harm

Spastic Versus Flaccid Plevic Floor

Key Questions:

  1. Which component spastic/flaccid is essential to address first?
  2. Does one ever exist without the other?

Click on the photo of the newsletter to download a copy!

VOL. 1 | ISSUE 3

NEW THIS ISSUE

Manual Versus Mechanical Biofeedback

Key Questions:

  1.  Which biofeedback technique is more specific? Manual or Mechanical?

Click on the photo of the newsletter to download a copy!

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 1

NEW THIS ISSUE

Key Risk Factors for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Key Questions:

  1.  What are the seven primary risk factors of female pelvic floor dysfunction?

Click on the photo of the newsletter to download a copy!

SPECIAL ISSUES

ACADEMY NEWSLETTERS

SPECIAL ISSUE 1

NEW THIS ISSUE

Pelvic Power Release 

Key Questions:

  1. Can pelvic power release be utilized to diagnose and treat both spastic and flaccid muscles within the pelvic floor?

Click on the photo of the newsletter to download a copy!

SPECIAL ISSUE 2

NEW THIS ISSUE

ChiroQueen Concierge Model of Care

Key Questions:

  1. What model of care provides the highest respect for the sensitive nature of pelvic floor treatment?

Click on the photo of the newsletter to download a copy!

SPECIAL ISSUE 3

NEW THIS ISSUE

FloorRehab

Key Questions:

  1. What are the three primary muscles and one primary muscle group that define the true “lower core”?

Click on the photo of the newsletter to download a copy!

Scroll to Top